Jarrod Overson

Wanton Hackery, a guide to things you probably shouldn't do

Jarrod Overson - Wanton Hackery, a guide to things you probably shouldn't do

Re: Programming

I started coding nearly two decades ago, when I was 11 years old and hacking away at Z80 assembly on a graphing calculator. Once my first game was manually distributed via link cables throughout my high school I was hooked and couldn’t stop learning. I absorbed information obsessively and taught myself whatever language I came across.

I was in love from byte 01 but recognized it as a laborious process attempting to wring the last bit of juice out of limited machines. The day I first learned about direct assembly language is still etched in my mind. How amazingly fast I could write to the screen now!

And the grayscale! The glorious grayscale! I was no longer limited to 2 colors. I now had 6. Four beautiful shades of gray!

From that point on I eagerly sought out new languages and have printed “Hello World” on everything from clocks to recovered cell phone displays. I started by focusing primary with perl due to the amazing community that allowed me learn and create my first dynamic web pages. Once I started mixing javascript, css, and perl together in full web applications my head literally exploded. Literally. It is now held together with duct tape and whistles when the wind hits it at certain angles.

It has been a wild ride over the past 15 or so years, watching technology grow. User interfaces have progressed to a point where using a computer can now be a genuine joy. We are no longer severely burdened by machine, input, or bandwidth limitations and have such amazing power dripping from our fingertips.

I am extremely fond of perl, ruby, and javascript with a great respect for java. If I had my way, though, I’d program exclusively in JavaScript right now. Its capabilities seem to grow by the day and the communities surrounding it are incredible.